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Designer clothing for the real woman that happens to be modest. Versatile, everyday chic Made in NY

 

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Meet MTJF It Girl Nora

Yonit Willis

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Meet Nora, an MTJF Wear It Girl and 23 year old style savant hailing from Staten Island. You may have seen her iconic street style shots from NYFW on our social media, and now you have the chance to get to know the young woman behind the cutting edge images. Find out where she get's her fashion inspiration, what advice she has to offer, and more in this insider interview. 

1. Can you tell us a little bit about yourself?

My name is Nora Shvartsberg, I'm 23 and am from Staten Island, New York. I went to Pace University for my undergrad and received my Bachelor of Science in Communication Sciences & Disorders/Psychology. Currently, I'm enrolled at Hofstra University's Master of Education program in Higher Education in hopes to obtain a leadership position in a college or university. I have always had an interest and strong desire to be a model or do something in expressing myself creatively ever since I embraced my curly hair and realized it isn't a burden, but a personal statement. My other interests include tap dancing, photography, cooking and playing with my cats. 

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2. How would you describe your sense of style?

My sense of style is a cross between preppy, classic and vintage. The best way I would describe my style would be put together. I'm not a fan of sloppyness, ripped elements or too much color. I like to stick to a basic color scheme, color block and include either silver or gold. I love Marshalls. It's near my house and its pretty much my sanctuary for clothes. On a college student budget, its the best place to dress designer and find some really amazing pieces. Some days I feel like I walked out of a Jcrew catalogue while other days I might look transported back in time. It depends on occassion and mood.

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3. Where do you get your fashion inspiration?

My fashion inspiration stems from the decades of the 30's-40's. I love the form fitting clothes worn by women accompanied by hats, I love hats. I follow very few fashion bloggers on Instagram and try to stem some styling but other times it would be from catalogues or simply seeing outfits in store windows.

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4. What advice would you give to women of this generation?

The best advice I can give to women of this generation is respect yourself and your body and everyone else will respect you. Through style, find pieces that make you feel and look your best, take risks with new patterns, styles and colors but don't demote your standards to keep up with the newest fads.

When Technology and Fashion Collide

Yonit Willis

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By Yonit Willis, modest fashion blogger at Miss Mellalina. 

In an age of ever-changing technology it was only a matter of time before the fashion industry decided to climb aboard the train full speed ahead. Now, more than ever before, designers are finding ways to fuse fashion and technology together. One reason why such forward-thinking is a win for the industry is because technology could be the answer to creating more ethical and sustainable production.

Take Air Dye for example, a technology that enables water-free dyeing and printing on textiles that New York-based fashion house Costello Tagliapietra have used for several seasons to color their fabrics. Natsai Audrey Chieza, a leading materials designer and systems thinker working in the field of biotechnology told Whitney Bauck, an assistant editor at Fashionista, that “interventions that tackle both water use and chemical use in the textile industry are incredibly rare, so this is an area of development many are watching very closely.”

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Another technology garnering attention is 3-D printing, a technique that avoids fabric waste and allows designers to create outfits on a when-needed basis instead of letting stock pile up. Dutch designer Iris van Herpen has taken advantage of 3-D printing for years now and in an interview with Vogue reminisced how long it used to take, “I remember the first piece I printed took seven days….but it doesn’t take that long anymore. It’s pretty fast.”

These innovations are just the tip of the iceberg. Biologist and designer, Anke Domaske, has found a way to create sustainable textile fibres from wasted milk. Zoa, the world’s first bio fabricated leather brand that addresses the environmental impact raising livestock has on our planet, has just been launched. And Stella McCartney has teamed up with Bolt Threads, a startup that has emerged as one of the leaders making synthetic spider silk.

More Than Just Figleaves is in tune with today’s fashion consciousness and our upcycled collection is proof of that. Read more about why Eve Emanuel the owner and founder of MTJF decided go the sustainable route here

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Is Brooklyn the New Fashion Hotspot?

Yonit Willis

 By Yonit Willis, modest fashion blogger at  Miss Mellalina   A few years back, i-D Magazine came out with an article questioning whether Brooklyn has become New York's new epicenter of fashion. After all, more and more designers are selecting the most populous borough to be their home and emerging artists seem to have a better grasp on the young generation. And now, in 2017, it seems as though Brooklyn is just bursting with fresh talent and hundreds of job opportunities are opening up in the industry. From Kai D,. a Williamsburg-based menswear line that appeals to the modern man who is also a fan of vintage, to Stendhal, a Brooklyn-based accessories line made solely out of recycled glass beads sourced from Bali, there is no shortage of creativity and eccentricity.  Another reason for the big Brooklyn boom is due to the city's efforts to keep the garment district alive. In fact, New York City has tripled it's investment in local fashion initiatives and came out with an ad campaign championing locally produced products. "The fashion industry is being squeezed out of Manhattan" native New Yorker Marvin Schein told Inc Magazine, "we want to encourage it to stay in New York." And thanks to the founder of Manufacture New York, Bob Bland, that dream just might become a reality. There's been 25 years of offshoring U.S. apparel manufacturing jobs to Asia and Bland is out to change that. "In 1960, 95 percent of what Americans wore was actually made in New York", she told Inc, "Today, it's 3 percent." And now, her attempts to revitalize the industry have helped up-and-coming talent such as Daniel Silverstein, an FIT graduate who quit his job at Victoria's Secret because he felt the company wasted way too much fabric in the production process. He then went on to create his own collection created from excess fabric only to find he didn't have the resources to make the business work, that is until Bland's innovation hub came to the rescue.  To sum it up, Refinery29 got it right when they said "Sure, hype-generating Manhattanites will always pump the city's heartbeat, but there are a handful of seamsters from across the East River on the verge of being the Next Big Thing." And More Than Just Figleaves is honored to be one of them, Brooklyn-based and 100% Made in New York. 

By Yonit Willis, modest fashion blogger at Miss Mellalina

A few years back, i-D Magazine came out with an article questioning whether Brooklyn has become New York's new epicenter of fashion. After all, more and more designers are selecting the most populous borough to be their home and emerging artists seem to have a better grasp on the young generation. And now, in 2017, it seems as though Brooklyn is just bursting with fresh talent and hundreds of job opportunities are opening up in the industry. From Kai D,. a Williamsburg-based menswear line that appeals to the modern man who is also a fan of vintage, to Stendhal, a Brooklyn-based accessories line made solely out of recycled glass beads sourced from Bali, there is no shortage of creativity and eccentricity.

Another reason for the big Brooklyn boom is due to the city's efforts to keep the garment district alive. In fact, New York City has tripled it's investment in local fashion initiatives and came out with an ad campaign championing locally produced products. "The fashion industry is being squeezed out of Manhattan" native New Yorker Marvin Schein told Inc Magazine, "we want to encourage it to stay in New York." And thanks to the founder of Manufacture New York, Bob Bland, that dream just might become a reality. There's been 25 years of offshoring U.S. apparel manufacturing jobs to Asia and Bland is out to change that. "In 1960, 95 percent of what Americans wore was actually made in New York", she told Inc, "Today, it's 3 percent." And now, her attempts to revitalize the industry have helped up-and-coming talent such as Daniel Silverstein, an FIT graduate who quit his job at Victoria's Secret because he felt the company wasted way too much fabric in the production process. He then went on to create his own collection created from excess fabric only to find he didn't have the resources to make the business work, that is until Bland's innovation hub came to the rescue.

To sum it up, Refinery29 got it right when they said "Sure, hype-generating Manhattanites will always pump the city's heartbeat, but there are a handful of seamsters from across the East River on the verge of being the Next Big Thing." And More Than Just Figleaves is honored to be one of them, Brooklyn-based and 100% Made in New York. 

Why I Went the Sustainable Route

Yonit Willis

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by Eve Emanuel, owner and founder of More Than Just Figleaves 

Having always been a purist at heart, I have held onto many pieces from my own wedding 30 years ago that have become vintage in their own right. I cannot part with them and sometimes use them together with contemporary pieces. They were lovingly made in Europe during the eighties, when quality fashion was purely the accepted norm for any consumer. They have stood the test of time.

When I began my business in 2015, Quality workmanship and timeless fashion in order to achieve long lasting wear-ability were my two top priorities. This is in its own right a form of sustainability! 

For if a garment fits well is made well and is timeless, there is no need to fill your closet with piles of disposable fashion trend items that land up in the landfill the following season.

As I set out on my treks around the Manhattan garment district, I was dismayed at the pile of leftover fabrics and scraps (totally reusable) that were going to end up being dumped. Such a shame I had no place to store them or I would have housed them and never had to buy fabric ever again!

Another thing that happens in the industry, and I have experienced this first hand, is that there may be a slight design glitch that is fixable in a run of clothing. If it does not sell, the clothing gets “dumped” again or sent to a discount store which could hurt an up-and-coming brand.

I have found tremendous satisfaction in using existing pieces and changing them into a new upgraded up-cycled style. Such as adding longer pockets into a skirt, recreating facings or adding new fabric to cuffs using scraps as detailing.

In Sep 2016 I signed up for 2017 KCFW . As it loomed ahead, I examined my room full of fabric leftovers, the thought of paying for a whole slew of new fabrics was cramping my brain almost as much as the fabric I owned was cramping my space!

Hence came the idea to create the collection for the show using solely the fabrics that I owned in my workroom! There were squares of fabrics with shapes cut into them, some small yardages, and scraps. 

And somehow a weight was lifted off my shoulders as I started to piece together and create anew from these pieces of fabric. It was kind of liberating.

I partnered with jewelry designer Erin of ep design, an artist in her own right and she created a line of jewelry from all her old copper pots and pans and used her own leftover materials from her studio. 

Our up-cycled collection all came together seamlessly in a very global vision of color and texture. The looks were each unique, the fabric scraps telling their own story.

I invite you to take a look at the result of our work, both at the show, here.

In September this year we took the looks onto the streets of NY at NYFW Where the rawness of each piece was highlighted and appreciated for their wearability and streetstyle appeal.  

Another motive of putting the looks to the streets was to test the reaction of the public and fashion minded street photographers. And guess what?  Our “fringe dress" got featured in Cosmopolitan Magazine as one of their jaw-dropping street style photos from New York Fashion Week. 

This triumph illustrates the power of today’s fashion consciousness where fashion is taking a turn away from the mass production of yesteryear (phew!) and concentrating on the unique creativity and thought that goes into producing something unique inspired by such values as function form and sustainability. 

 

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Influencer Crush of the day| Malky Weichbrod

Charlotte Smith

 

Meet the Orthodox Jewish Fashionista Who’s Giving Modesty a New Name We love her style and she loves our clothes too.  Malky Weichbrod.  Back in 2015, she gave us the seal of approval, by showing us some love on her instagram page in our beloved polka dot dress.  Because of this plug we have not stopped making the dress because it was such a success with our fans.

 

This tells you although trends come and go, personal style remains key for women. This fashionista stays true to her modest culture and style, but dreamt of dressing like the Jewish songstress Barbara Streisand in “What’s up Doc,” n and Audrey Hepburn in “How To Steal a Million,” and Jane Fonda in “Barefoot in the Park”.The kicky style icons of the technicolor movies she  watched growing up  with her grandmother Miriam.

 

We were so flattered that that she likes MTJFwear.  For us it’s more important for an influencer such has Malky to embrace us. It confirms that we are on the right track, and have reached our target audience.  That is why she is our influencer crush of the day.

MTJF WEAR|Clothing that ‘Just Happens to be Modest'

Eve Emanuel

MTJF WEAR|Clothing that ‘Just Happens to be Modest

Modest fashion is often misunderstood. It is placed in a box, with the perception that  “If you are modest you must want to wear a baggy dress, or maxi dress, or robe like structure that is willowy “

 

Well as a designer that caters to a modest market, I want to show that we designers can spread our wings.  I have set out to change that. With the inception of MTJFwear, a line of modest women's clothing that is chic, sartorial inspired, well crafted and constructed,  with a silhouette that shouts “woman” without being suggestive or sexy.

My story:

As a fashion designer,  I am interested in creating not just a product, but a story , as lifestyle designer brand with a true and steadfast brand message.  We as modest women are sophisticated and sensitive to quality cut and craftsmanship just like any other discerning fashionable woman. We as modest women are entitled to have designers represent us universally in the fashion arena, who  create clothing that has a strong brand message and idea. The brand should talk to all women regardless of religion . The fact they just happen to conform to certain guidelines should not be the shoutout factor. They… “just happen to be modest”

How did it all start?

I found myself on a cliff face every day that I wanted to get dressed . Faced with the choice of a maxi dress  frills and an elastic waist. In reality the garments were ill fitting, cheap in  quality and cut or extremely tight. Too  tight for my real woman's (slightly plump but NOT plus size ) figure.

Any skirt lengths that did  conform to my standards of modesty, were the most hideous of all - made of cheap polyester and cut as if to hang off the waistline like an item fit for a charity cast off . Also product quality had been declining over the years, (see other blog post_) and I was fed up of throwing out pieces after a year as they disintegrated in the wash due to either poor assembly or fabric quality.

So I started to sew my own clothing,  our story of More Than Just Fig Leaves starting with skirts.  First and foremost what started me off was to fulfill my own needs to have available hip classic yet trendy well made pieces.   That would stand a test of time and work as  building blocks basics, that to the laws of modesty were necessary for my lifestyle, and  to complement the fast fashionble pieces that I owned.

Secondly, I needed solid bread and butter pieces. Take a solid orange atreano  skirt  will sewn, with binding detail, etc. That can basically go with any t shirt, top, vest, sweatshirt etc. (show worn different ways.)

See here the pink silk skirt .. above.

Or velvet skirt

All wearable , edgy in cut and style, timeless enough to keep and use for many seasons and many occasions….

 

The Woes of Fast Fashion

Eve Emanuel

“The woes of Fast Fashion 1”

 

In my youth I was exposed to the fashion arena of Milan , Paris and London in their heyday . The eighties was an economic upswing  which enabled the manufactures, of high quality well made clothing for happily padded middle classes.   Happy to throw their money away to increase the quantity of their closets.

 

Retail shops were at their peak as Flagship stores touted the likes of Benetton,  Stefanel (I still own a blouse from that one.)  As Well as the known brand names Dior, Valentino and others. Back to 2017 , Internet shopping  has increased the need for fast fashion.  Now companies such as ASOS, H&M, Zara, The Gap and others have to fill the demand for more and cheap fast fashion.  As well as keep up with the chameleon like trends of the fashion hype of the moment.

 

Enter Fast Fashion

In order to feed this growing monster of demand supply and quick to those who don’t want to stop and smell the roses, these companies must outsource most of their labor and factories to places far away from the end consumer, plus meet the need for a low price point and quick turnaround in production.  This often involves unethical business practices.   

 

Such as exploited labor, tons of fabric wastage, and damage to the environment (another topic for another blog post). The end result of the product in the retail chain is often a  product of what is coined today as “fast fashion”, a quickly spun up piece of clothing produced in mass quantities to serve an ever growing need to buy new .

A slow grassroots awareness for the need of slow fashion has come about.

Lately many Indie designers have sprung up such as Daniel Silverstain who upcycles scraps to create new fabrics.  Some have even honed their  “home industries”  to refashion themselves  into legitimate small and successful fashion lines such as Demestix who launched on Etsy.com.  The crux? To fulfill a void of misunderstood people in need of individual attention.

There is an undercurrent growing need for something made with quality and love.  Garments that celebrate individuality and that can meet  the subconscious needs of women.  Who are unaware why they are so unhappy with their shopping experiences.

 

And this is where we MTJf position ourselves. Aswell as just providing Modest Clothing , we are universally tackling that void for those who want good craftsmanship and cut.  A well made product that will then fit in with their lifestyle and up the ante of their wardrobe .  There is enough hype, there are enough fast fashion items out there today. It is our job to provide what is not there to complement the fast fashion arena.

 

 

Fireside chat at Rebecca Minkoff New York

Eve Emanuel

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As we start to get the brand out there, one thing we know is it helps to network and create buzz. We were invited by the lovely people at @sixdegrees to attend a special event at Rebecca Minkoff's flagship store in Soho’s chic New York digs .

As I approached Soho NYC in my minivan,the energy was electrifying as one brand name store after the other offered eye platters of eye candy displays, as each store strove to offer and experience of enticement .  This is the atmosphere in New York around the holiday’s. The Rebecca Minkoff boutique is sandwiched  between the likes of Dior.  This was our  Pre holiday season stroll through Soho!

The six degrees society run by Emily Merrel, aims at connecting women who "want to connect" with other women, and sometimes there are co ed events. The aim is, to help entrepreneurs network and grow their brand through collaborating or working with others.  This is an idea we embrace and love to participate.  Rebecca is one of the brands we look to for inspiration, her story is one of the new generation of keys to building your brand.

On the night of the event, female entrepreneurs were there from all around the US.  The event was filled with women who had ended up in the big apple following their dreams. We chatted about fashion, our dreams and our own start up fashion businesses.

We were  privileged to be paired  with Beitt Adams  of Whitby handbags,her brand of beautiful bags are inspired and created with an end slavery goal in mind infusing designs on the bags interlinings with with meaningful art made by disadvantaged women worldwide.  After meeting this young talent we hope to collaborate on a project to support her efforts, because MTJF is all about celebrating and supporting our peers.

We all mixed in mingled and shopped of course. We all enjoyed a fabulous 20% discount on any merch from Rebecca Minkoff that night.

We invested in a  black glitter evening bag, to be featured with my MTJF Wear soon...!

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From Day to Night

Eve Emanuel

 Lisbeth shows us how day to night can be done with a change of accessories.

Lisbeth shows us how day to night can be done with a change of accessories.

In a fast paced world, we need versatile fashion more and more . Most often we need to change from work or dyawear and rush off to an event or function. This spurred me on to design clothing that would have a fluid function . Take our velvet collection for example.  An easy care  velvet was selected that would take the wear and tear of walking the streets, and yet look glam for evening.

Styling tips: With the change of a shoe a little make up and accessories the transfromation can be quick and painless! 

We asked Lisbeth to take our velvet collection to the streets for both day and night and this was the result.

Why Recycle?

Eve Emanuel

"plastic bags on  a fence" NYC 2015

 

THE BEAUTY OF SUSTAINABILITY IN FASHION

My weekly sojourn to the Garment Center in New York City,  often leaves me wistful as I eye boxes of 'scraps"  about to be trashed. Many of these  scraps are in fact yardages of beautiful fabric that are not needed for the project at hand, the trashing of which is often the result of companies and manufacturers not looking at a production solution for these small quantities.

Dealing with waste the old way was  NOT TO BOTHER or think about the outcome.  Time was and still is a factor in business and making and money. And many in the established Garment Manufacture industry have not got that time to thinkg about the results. .

Nevertheless many designers such as Stella Mcartney and local designer Daniel Silverstayn are creating waves by making statements in their choices in how they source their fabrics, and how they are treating their waste. This gave me ample oppurtunity to do the same, and my dream of turning scraps, muslins, and pre production pieces to reproduce new collections is becoming a reality accepted in the fashion arena worldwide. 

Sustainable fabrics, and sustainability is a broad term that includes any product that will enhance or preserve our natural resources or protect our living environment . Be it lace, tricot, woven print , or plain cotton, fabrics are first gleaned from natural resources, go through a laborious process of weaving dying and sorting before it gets to the factory. From there, packaging, shipping costs, delivery and shelf preservation are other hidden costs and labor processes that add value to every inch of fabric.

The "new age" collection  that was introduced at our Fashion show at Kansas City Fashion Week, is in fact a concoction of recycled fabrics and inspired by and using a chiffon floral print taken from some sample run chiffon dresses . See before and after pictures below.

FULL LINED CHIFFON DRESS SUMMER 2014.  SUMMER 2016 , AND THE SAMPLE PIECES YIELDED BEAUTIFUL FABRIC FOR MY NEW AGE PROJECT OF BLENDING OLD WITH NEW.

FABRIC USED FOR A SKIRT OVERLAY INTERPLAYING WITH OTHER SUSTAINABLY SOURCED FABRICS,  SEEN HERE AT A RUNWAY SHOW SPRING 2016.

It is the hope of MTJF  to continue using and sourcing sustainable fabrics and feel emboldened to break the tradition of waste that has far exceeded itself in our "fast fashion" industry. 

 

photoshoot for wearmtjf #1

Eve Emanuel

Sunday morning The Demureist, Lisbeth our model,  and myself , met for the first shoot of the Wearmtjf Campaign.  The purpose of this photoshoot was to describe the clothing in real terms. Therefore we asked Lisbeth to behave as if she was stopped on the street. The focus was natural and uncontrived. 

The sun was out, and it was a gorgeous Sunday morning. A perfect setting for photographing.The Demureist had previously captured a picture on her instagram blog, that had a natural alive quality to it, so  I insisted that she be the one to do this shoot. 

Malin Landeus Vintage kindly collaborated with us on this project.  Malin is an influencer for many designers. With her stunning collection of purist pieces picked for their timelesness, I was only too happy that we were able to browse for a few accessories. we settled for a yellow leather "over the shoulder" bag, and matching felt hat to top off the "look" which was leaning a little towards the 70's - boho chic and retro all in one.

Lisbeth was going to be wearing the velvet suit today. A retro print sample from early MTJF days, was placed under the cape .

The focus was on a natural look,  so the model applied her own makeup.

Then off to the streets for some great Urban Streetstyle!

Find more pics on our WEARMTJF page...

Shop Velvet skirts...

 

 

How a single blouse can freshen your style

Eve Emanuel

A Signature Piece is a basic that stands on it's own. It is not part of  a set, something that you can wear with stuff you already have. Take our signature blouse either in Classic Creme, or Garden of Eden print . The colors are bright, the print retro.  Wear it under a suit you thought was dull to revive your senses . Wear it under a vest, waistcoat, or even to work . Under a jacket, or with a skirt, with denim or cotton . 

Comfortable fabric means you are not limited to either day or evening wear. You will feel good whatever time of day .Crisp 100% cotton broadcloth (cotton creme blouse) breathes, and wash and wear poly charmeuse (garden of Eden blouse)  feel soft against your skin. And bespoke details like a french seam finish and super shirring on the sleeve cuffs. make all the difference to how you feel .

 

Here's how  two fashion bloggers  find ways to spruce up their wardrobes with this wardrobe staple 

 Avie from Fashionably Frum Blog props up some t shirt basics with a little romance and structure with our classic creme blouse

Avie from Fashionably Frum Blog props up some t shirt basics with a little romance and structure with our classic creme blouse


In defense of slow fashion

Eve Emanuel

Today I am tackling a debate. Slow fashion versus fast fashion. Two articles that came my way recently , one from Vogue Runway in my e mail box, and the other invitation from my own very personal fashion Icon left me wondering if the current fashion industry has been taken over by some peculiar auto immune disease. 

The invitation , was from Jussara Lee-  a veteran luxury designer of bespoke clothing for the  real aristocrat of the senses.( Her clothing is not out to show or prove. It just is. But that is for another time to discuss. ) In any case, the invitation was to view a The True Cost ,  a documentary take on fast fashion . The second , a mailing from Vogue contained the disturbing news of the firing of  gentle natured designer and maestro of Lanvin for the past fourteen years - Alber Elbaz- by his business owners. His "crime" was attempting to please real women , and create a vision true to his own , while also accepting that "party glamour and red carpet dresses were the demands of the industry hype. 

As a result, I became an enthusiast in spreading Andrew Morgan’s take on the largest segment of the fashion industry: fast fashion
— Jussara Lee

What both the designers mentioned above have in common , is a true sense of themsleves and fashion integrity.  They are gentle and sweet tempered which outflows into their designs. They are looking to create what the woman on the street can wear with delight and use for many years to come. They have formed the basis of my fashion philosophy. Indeed Jussara is one designer who inspired me to become a designer, for without the human element of connection, what is creativity all about?

 

Style voice with Style Cartel

Eve Emanuel

As I look back over the past pics of MTJF wear worn by diverse women of different ages , color, and culture, it strikes me as how veratile our pieces are . At first when More Than Just Figleaves was incepted, my vision was to create comfort and understated chic . I guess veratility is an offshoot from that. 

Take our recent "fashion celebrity"Charlotte Smith Galoul, Editor in Chief of a lively cheeky up and coming style blog called Style Cartel. Charlotte was looking for modest wear to put on during her European Tour of Paris, Milan ,and Istanbul Fashion week. 

She wore the cropped cotton shirt that stuck our refreshingly beneath a leather jacket , in a photo with  no less than .Lineisy Montero of Fendi and Prada Fame. Then she used our classic creme blouse under a  knitted tunic. Her favorite was deinitely the black sateen  Godet skirt  which can take you from elegant to sporty with the addtion of heels, or a sweatshirt. I particularly love the way she wears it with the "bowling style " shoe and fun socks with it.

 

Why we love the Demureist

Eve Emanuel

MTJF loves The Demureist! That cannot be stated enough. 

A few months ago, we teamed up with Mariana Aguilera; editor of The Demureist to host our first fashion showcase. As host, she made our showcase livelier and added her personal flair to every aspect of the day. Mariana was such as sweet, hardworking, and amazing person who loved shared our love of modest fashion, craftsmanship, and style! 

Mariana says this about what her site is all about:

"The Demureist is a an outlet for me to express my appreciation for us women, modest fashion and create a platform for women from all faiths and walks of life who to are personally changing and evolving(who have a voice) at the rhythm of their own lives, because the point is to move ahead from our past selves". 

We love Marianas passion , sincerity and artistry which has given modest fashion blogging a high profile expo0sure. We look forward to continue working in the name of modest fashion and supporting all the endevors of The Demureist. Check out her wonderful website here. 

To view photos of our fashion showcase hosted by the Demureist click here.

And shop MTJF here

Inside Our Fashion Showcase

Eve Emanuel

Our Fashion Showcase was an amazing time, not only to present our collection, but to meet new people. At our fashion showcase last month, we got a chance to rub shoulders with amazing bloggers, journalists, editors, artists, and fashionistas! 

Here's a look inside of our Fashion Showcase 

More Than Just Figleaves is very universal in nature, its for the modern modest woman. The versatility of the clothing will work for any woman.
— Eve; MTJF Designer
 Aviva Bamberger of  Revealing Modesty  with More Than Just Figleaves Designer Eve.

Aviva Bamberger of Revealing Modesty with More Than Just Figleaves Designer Eve.

 Blogger Emily Men (@emilymen) & guest take in the MTJF Showcase

Blogger Emily Men (@emilymen) & guest take in the MTJF Showcase

I loved all the clothing especially that blue set!
— Aviva Bamberger, Reavealing Modesty
 Blogger Katie Miller (@thektmiller) and guest  take a chance to take snaps of their own of the MTJF Collection. 

Blogger Katie Miller (@thektmiller) and guest  take a chance to take snaps of their own of the MTJF Collection. 

 Natasha Garoosi of  WTF Digital  and her sister attended our fashion showcase in style!

Natasha Garoosi of WTF Digital and her sister attended our fashion showcase in style!

 Amazingly Stylish Bloggers Roxi and Diane(@official_xeenah) came to hang out and view the collection.

Amazingly Stylish Bloggers Roxi and Diane(@official_xeenah) came to hang out and view the collection.

 Our talented makeup artist Akiyo Koyama; who made our models look amazing, poses with MTJF designer Eve. 

Our talented makeup artist Akiyo Koyama; who made our models look amazing, poses with MTJF designer Eve. 

 Guests take the opportunity to snap photos of the collection. 

Guests take the opportunity to snap photos of the collection. 

Black Pencil Godet Skirt

Eve Emanuel

Black Pencil Godet Skirt

A skillfully made piece, our Calf  Length Black Pencil Godet Skirt. Made of 100% Heavywieght Stretch Cotton Sateen, it will contour your body for a true designer look. 

Pencil skirts have been very prevalent in the fashion world to date. This 50s wardrobe staple has always exuded extreme femininity, style and sophistication. You can find pencil skirts in any retail store today . But what makes our skirt stand out amongst the rest?

The answer is simple--shape and style with comfort. Most pencil skirts, while excellent to use to show off an hourglass figure; tend to fail the comfort challenge. They squeeze the very breath out of you as if they were actual corsets. But our Black Pencil Skirt achieves that hourglass figure look without depriving you of your precious oxygen.  We have our stretch heavyweight cotton to thank for this miraculous achievement! Another unique feature of this skirt is the Godet at the back allowing freedom of movement without comprmising on modesty and style. There you have it, a pencil skirt without all the infamous restrictiveness, and modest to boot!



Romance in the air

Kamille Rodriguez

Our first moodboard used to shoot the first collection of four skirts and two blouses,  is rich with color and romanticism. Inspired by our Garden of Eden blouse, some of these pictures have also served as inspiration for other designs.

Setting the romantic mood for winter our moodboard with romantic undertones and color.

Our first moodboard used to shoot the first collection of four skirtss and two blouses,  is rich with color and romanticism. Inspired by our Garden of Eden blouse, some of these pictures have also served as inspiration for other designs. Take a look at the central picture of vintage print victorian petticoat skirts. These were the inspo for our Calebrese petticoat skirt in polka dot or houndstooth flannel.  Notice the pale blue tones along with mustards and yellow. a first drawing rendered from rough sketches , for MTJF by Designer and fashion  illustrator            is at the top . See our figleaf blouse and black godet skirt coming to life on paper.

The Back Room on the Eastside

Kamille Rodriguez

We knew we found our home the moment we entered The Back Room in the historic Lower East Side, NYC. Their staff was friendly and helpful, and their decor was perfect for our vintage inspired photoshoot

Located just off the Williamsburg Bridge, The Back Room is a hive of antique pieces strewn across a weathered dark wooden floor, furnished with lavish wall coverings reminiscent of a bygone era, it provided the perfect backdrop for our winter line which was largely art deco inspired.

MTJF at Marine Park

Eve Emanuel

 Yoneat of  Miss Mellalina , a style student at FIT offered to model for our "Shot in the Park"

Yoneat of Miss Mellalina, a style student at FIT offered to model for our "Shot in the Park"

Photo shoot : " A shot in the Park" . Location:  Marine Park  Brooklyn, NY.  Make Up: By Vesta Photography: Chavi Taitlelbaum 

  Vesta created a romantic visage with rose pink lips and spring hues on eyelids.

Vesta created a romantic visage with rose pink lips and spring hues on eyelids.

 Friend and associate, Chavi Taitelbaum hopped around getting some great shots.The spacious park provided the perfect backdrop for the MTJF Collection. A blowing wind and hint of spring daffodils provided a backrop to bold, bright, colors and floral prints from our fledgling collection.